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Reblogged from earthstory  108 notes
earthstory:

Neolithic forest uncovered by stormsTen years of erosion in one winter is the phrase that the British natural Trust used to describe the effects of this winter’s endless series of storms that had battered the Atlantic coast of Europe (seehttp://tinyurl.com/kvrsluv) , and it may prove a bonanza for fossil hunters and archaeologists alike, as many new finds have been uncovered (though other known sites have been damaged, for example in the Orkney isles). A prehistoric oak, pine and alder forest 4,500 to 6,000 years old, once known as Borth woods, has emerged from the marine muds at the bottom of Cardigan Bay off the coast of Wales. The British Isles abound with legends of land under the sea, recording a folk memory of the land before the sea level rises at the end of the ice age changed the topography forever. In this case, the lost kingdom of Cantre’r Gwaelod (recorded in Arthurian legend) may have partly emerged from its watery tomb. Evidence of ancient man has also been found in the area, such as hearths, footprints and wooden walkways.LozImage credit: Keith Morris/LNPhttp://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/gallery/2014/feb/21/prehistoric-forest-uncovered-by-storms-in-cardigan-bay-in-pictures

earthstory:

Neolithic forest uncovered by storms

Ten years of erosion in one winter is the phrase that the British natural Trust used to describe the effects of this winter’s endless series of storms that had battered the Atlantic coast of Europe (seehttp://tinyurl.com/kvrsluv) , and it may prove a bonanza for fossil hunters and archaeologists alike, as many new finds have been uncovered (though other known sites have been damaged, for example in the Orkney isles). 

A prehistoric oak, pine and alder forest 4,500 to 6,000 years old, once known as Borth woods, has emerged from the marine muds at the bottom of Cardigan Bay off the coast of Wales. The British Isles abound with legends of land under the sea, recording a folk memory of the land before the sea level rises at the end of the ice age changed the topography forever. In this case, the lost kingdom of Cantre’r Gwaelod (recorded in Arthurian legend) may have partly emerged from its watery tomb. Evidence of ancient man has also been found in the area, such as hearths, footprints and wooden walkways.

Loz

Image credit: Keith Morris/LNP

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/gallery/2014/feb/21/prehistoric-forest-uncovered-by-storms-in-cardigan-bay-in-pictures